Background Image

Arkansas Living August 2012 : Page-31

Stay Healthy All School Year by Magen Howard to the store or buying a new pair of jeans and some sneakers. Consider these issues before the first bell sounds. You are what you eat Packing lunch ensures that you control what fuels your child’s body. The National Institutes of Health recommends making lunch a family activity – kids usually want to eat what they’ve helped prepare. Let your child choose from a variety of easy-to-pack snacks, like cheese sticks, whole fruits and crackers. And if your morning is rushed, try packing lunch in the evening be-fore bedtime. But sometimes packing isn’t always prac-tical and school-provided lunches become necessary. In January 2012, the federal gov-ernment upped standards for school meals – the first revision in 15 years – that will make them healthier. Among the requirements are an offering of fruits and veggies every day, along with more whole-grain foods, and re-ducing the amount saturated fat, trans fats and sodium in the foods. All the preparation in the world, though, won’t help if your child gets to school and swaps his or her carrot sticks for someone else’s pudding cup. Like most habits, healthy eating begins at home. If good food choices are all a child has grown up with, he or she will be more likely to continue making good choices at school and beyond. Begin teaching your children healthy eating habits at home so they’ll make good choices at school lunchtime, too. preferred tools to clean hands. But, in a pinch, alcohol-based hand sanitizers work too (un-less hands are grubby – then soap is the only way to go), according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control. Teach your child good handwashing techniques, which include scrubbing the backs of hands, between fingers and under nails, and washing for at least 20 seconds. Handwashing is necessary around meal-times (both for eating and preparing food) and after using the bathroom, touching ani-mals or handling trash. Also, instill in your child the necessity of using a tissue when sneezing or coughing (or an elbow or shirt sleeve if tissues aren’t handy) and washing hands after. National Cancer Institute/Bill Branson Back-to-school prepa-ration means more than just toting a list of classroom items „ Serious Strength Made in USA Staying safe Before the start of each school year, have a chat with your kids about safety – from walking or driving to school to how to handle a bully. Encourage them to take safety drills seriously. Emergency plans are in place to protect your children. Urge them to memorize evac-uation routes and lockdown procedures, and obey teachers when these plans are enacted. For more resources on school safety, visit www.cdc.gov/Features/safeschools. • Sources: U.S. Centers for Disease Control, National Institutes of Health Wash, wash, wash your hands Schools are breeding grounds for illness, thanks to myriad shared surfaces and hygiene habits that are still a work in progress. Hand-washing remains the first line of defense in preventing the sniffles. Warm running water and soap are the AUGUST 2012 Scan for Video www.GorillaTough.com 1-800-966-3458 $5.$16$6/,9,1* , © 2012 Gorilla Glue Company 31

Health

Magen Howard

Stay Healthy All School Year<br /> <br /> Back-to-school preparation means more than just toting a list of classroom items to the store or buying a new pair of jeans and some sneakers. Consider these issues before the first bell sounds.<br /> <br /> You are what you eat<br /> <br /> Packing lunch ensures that you control what fuels your child’s body. The National Institutes of Health recommends making lunch a family activity – kids usually want to eat what they’ve helped prepare.<br /> <br /> Let your child choose from a variety of easy-to-pack snacks, like cheese sticks, whole fruits and crackers. And if your morning is rushed, try packing lunch in the evening before bedtime.<br /> <br /> But sometimes packing isn’t always practical and school-provided lunches become necessary. In January 2012, the federal government upped standards for school meals – the first revision in 15 years – that will make them healthier. Among the requirements are an offering of fruits and veggies every day, along with more whole-grain foods, and reducing the amount saturated fat, trans fats and sodium in the foods.<br /> <br /> All the preparation in the world, though, won’t help if your child gets to school and swaps his or her carrot sticks for someone else’s pudding cup.<br /> <br /> Like most habits, healthy eating begins at home. If good food choices are all a child has grown up with, he or she will be more likely to continue making good choices at school and beyond.<br /> <br /> Wash, wash, wash your hands<br /> <br /> Schools are breeding grounds for illness, thanks to myriad shared surfaces and hygiene habits that are still a work in progress. Handwashing remains the first line of defense in preventing the sniffles.<br /> <br /> Warm running water and soap are the Preferred tools to clean hands. But, in a pinch, alcohol-based hand sanitizers work too (unless hands are grubby – then soap is the only way to go), according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control.<br /> <br /> Teach your child good handwashing techniques, which include scrubbing the backs of hands, between fingers and under nails, and washing for at least 20 seconds.<br /> <br /> Handwashing is necessary around mealtimes (both for eating and preparing food) and after using the bathroom, touching animals or handling trash.<br /> <br /> Also, instill in your child the necessity of using a tissue when sneezing or coughing (or an elbow or shirt sleeve if tissues aren’t handy) and washing hands after.<br /> <br /> Staying safe<br /> <br /> Before the start of each school year, have a chat with your kids about safety – from walking or driving to school to how to handle a bully. Encourage them to take safety drills seriously.<br /> <br /> Emergency plans are in place to protect your children. Urge them to memorize evacuation routes and lockdown procedures, and obey teachers when these plans are enacted.<br /> <br /> For more resources on school safety, visit www.cdc.gov/Features/safeschools.<br /> <br /> Sources: U.S. Centers for Disease Control, National Institutes of Health

Gorilla Glue, Inc.

Using a screen reader? Click Here