ASPCA Summer 2012 : Page-18

Community outreach Since 2007, the ASPCA ® has lent our support to organizations nationwide through the ASPCA Partnership program. In every issue of ASPCA Action , we highlight the good works of our various partners and the vastly improved outcomes for homeless animals in each community. Louisville aims to save more lives as an ASPCA partner community. ASPCA Welcomes Louisville to Partnership We are thrilled to announce that Louisville, Kentucky, will become the next ASPCA partner community in an effort to save the lives of more at-risk and homeless pets. Charleston hero dog Jax gets a little love. Jax the Survivor Is Charleston’s Top Dog Left for dead after being hit by a car on River Road in Charleston, South Carolina, Jax, a beautiful chocolate Lab, was brought to the ASPCA’s partner agency, the Charleston Animal Society (CAS). Jax was severely injured, but CAS provided intensive care and surgery and assisted with the dog’s recovery, while simultaneously looking for the dog’s pet parents. But his family never claimed him. Sweet and gentle, Jax finally found a home with a family who could provide him with the care and training he needed. His road to recovery included intense physical therapy to learn to walk again on his shattered hip and leg. Jax was recently chosen by the Charleston County Parks and Recreation Commission to represent the agency as its Top Dog Mascot for 2012. The furry finalists were judged on friendliness, personality, temperament and behavior. Jax is one of 6,500 animals who were saved in Charleston County in 2011. This ASPCA partner community has made enormous strides in its efforts to save more lives, thanks to the hard work and collaboration of the shelter partners. Louisville-area animal welfare agencies, Louisville Metro Animal Services (LMAS), the Kentucky Humane Society (KHS), and Alley Cat Advocates (ACA), will have access to ASPCA resources, expertise and guidance, as well as strategic planning support, statistical analysis, training, and participation in ground-breaking research projects. The collaboration will also include annual planning meetings with Louisville partners to determine and monitor goals, strategies and needs. “Working together, we will improve the lives of cats and dogs in our community,” says Lori Redmon, president and CEO of the Kentucky Humane Society, “ensuring every healthy, adoptable pet is offered a second chance at finding happiness.” Last year, nearly 20,000 homeless animals entered the Louisville partner agencies. Aside from overcrowding in its shelters, some of the other challenges facing Louisville are a need for increased pet adoptions and targeted spay/neuter programs. Since 2007, the ASPCA has been lending its support, financially and through training and other human resources, to communities around the country with the goal of helping them save more animals’ lives. For more information about the ASPCA’s partnership with communities across the country, please visit www.aspca.org/aspcapartnership . 18

Community Outreach

Since 2007, the ASPCA® has lent our support to organizations nationwide through the ASPCA Partnership program. In every issue of ASPCA Action, we highlight the good works of our various partners and the vastly improved outcomes for homeless animals in each community.<br /> <br /> Jax the Survivor Is Charleston’s Top Dog <br /> <br /> Left for dead after being hit by a car on River Road in Charleston, South Carolina, Jax, a beautiful chocolate Lab, was brought to the ASPCA’s partner agency, the Charleston Animal Society (CAS). Jax was severely injured, but CAS provided intensive care and surgery and assisted with the dog’s recovery, while simultaneously looking for the dog’s pet parents. But his family never claimed him.<br /> <br /> Sweet and gentle, Jax finally found a home with a family who could provide him with the care and training he needed. His road to recovery included intense physical therapy to learn to walk again on his shattered hip and leg.<br /> <br /> Jax was recently chosen by the Charleston County Parks and Recreation Commission to represent the agency as its Top Dog Mascot for 2012. The furry finalists were judged on friendliness, personality, temperament and behavior.<br /> <br /> Jax is one of 6,500 animals who were saved in Charleston County in 2011. This ASPCA partner community has made enormous strides in its efforts to save more lives, thanks to the hard work and collaboration of the shelter partners.<br /> <br /> ASPCA Welcomes Louisville to Partnership <br /> <br /> We are thrilled to announce that Louisville, Kentucky, will become the next ASPCA partner community in an effort to save the lives of more at-risk and homeless pets.<br /> <br /> Louisville-area animal welfare agencies, Louisville Metro Animal Services (LMAS), the Kentucky Humane Society (KHS), and Alley Cat Advocates (ACA), will have access to ASPCA resources, expertise and guidance, as well as strategic planning support, statistical analysis, training, and participation in ground-breaking research projects. The collaboration will also include annual planning meetings with Louisville partners to determine and monitor goals, strategies and needs.<br /> <br /> “Working together, we will improve the lives of cats and dogs in our community,” says Lori Redmon, president and CEO of the Kentucky Humane Society, “ensuring every healthy, adoptable pet is offered a second chance at finding happiness.”<br /> <br /> Last year, nearly 20,000 homeless animals entered the Louisville partner agencies. Aside from overcrowding in its shelters, some of the other challenges facing Louisville are a need for increased pet adoptions and targeted spay/neuter programs.<br /> <br /> Since 2007, the ASPCA has been lending its support, financially and through training and other human resources, to communities around the country with the goal of helping them save more animals’ lives.

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