ASPCA Spring 2013 : Page 15

State Advocacy No Money to Fund Spay/Neuter? A Legislative Solution Is Available The math is simple. If we reduce the number of accidental litters, we reduce the number of suffering, homeless animals. Overpopulation is a problem for animals, for those who rescue them, and for every citizen because it burdens local communities and governments who must work that much harder to find homes or answers to this problem. Virtually every state struggles with pet overpopulation, and yet we know a solution exists: creating and expanding state spay/neuter programs. The State of Maine has a successful program already in place, and other states have tried to follow its lead. Unfortunately, state bills to create spay/neuter funding programs face stiff opposition from a surprising source: the pet food industry. In 2012, Americans spent approximately $12 billion on pet food. Yet when the Maryland Task Force on the Establishment of a Statewide Spay/Neuter Fund recommended creating a state-levied surcharge on pet food to finance a spay/neuter program, the industry’s lobbying arm fought vehemently against it—as they have done repeatedly in West Virginia, Indiana, Washington and several other states. The Maryland bill ultimately passed in April 2013. The surcharge works by requiring pet food manufacturers to pay an annual $100 registration for each brand they sell in Maryland; this is expected to bring in approximately $1 million yearly to fund spay/neuter. If the pet food companies choose to pass this expense on to their customers, it would cost the average cat owner a mere 26 cents and the annual dog owner 50 cents per animal, per year. A pet food surcharge is a reliable, substantial and sustainable source of revenue to fund state-run spay/neuter programs. Pet owners are willing to pay pennies per year to greatly reduce animal suffering. Prevention is the answer, and the time for this legislative solution has come. ASPCA 2013 ANNUAL MEETING OF MEMBERS The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals The ASPCA Board of Directors Solicits the Proxy: The undersigned hereby constitutes and appoints Mr. Tim F. Wray, Ms. Sally Spooner, and Mr. Edwin J. Sayres, or each or any of them, with the full power of substitution, as proxies to appear and vote in the name of the undersigned, at the offices of the ASPCA, 424 E 92nd St, 5th floor, New York, NY, on the day of June 11, 2013, at 9 A.M. and at any and all adjournments thereof; and the undersigned hereby revokes any other proxy herefore given to him or her and instructs said proxies to vote upon any business that may properly come before the meeting or any adjournment thereof. *You are allowed to attend and participate in the ASPCA 2013 Annual Meeting of Members only if you became a member of the ASPCA on or before the meeting record date of April 30, 2013, contributed $25 or more, and are over 18 years of age. If you do not plan to attend the meeting, please execute this proxy immediately. Send to: ASPCA, Attn: Annual Meeting Notice, 424 E 92nd St, 5th floor, New York, NY, 10018-4195 . Only proxies received through the mail by the ASPCA on or before June 10, 2013, shall be counted. The ASPCA 2013 Annual Meeting of Members will be held at The ASPCA, 424 E 92nd St, 5th floor, New York, NY at 9 A.M. on June 11, 2013 All ASPCA Members on record* are welcome to participate. Please note: If you are unable to attend to vote in person, please mail your proxy (see below). VOTING MEMBER PROXY | ASPCA ANNUAL MEETING OF MEMBERS | June 11, 2013 MEMBER’S NAME STREET ADDRESS CITY STATE ZIP SIGNATURE DATED Spring 2013 15

State Advocacy

No Money to Fund Spay/Neuter? A Legislative Solution Is Available <br /> <br /> The math is simple. If we reduce the number of accidental litters, we reduce the number of suffering, homeless animals. Overpopulation is a problem for animals, for those who rescue them, and for every citizen because it burdens local communities and governments who must work that much harder to find homes or answers to this problem. Virtually every state struggles with pet overpopulation, and yet we know a solution exists: creating and expanding state spay/neuter programs.<br /> <br /> The State of Maine has a successful program already in place, and other states have tried to follow its lead. Unfortunately, state bills to create spay/neuter funding programs face stiff opposition from a surprising source: the pet food industry.<br /> <br /> In 2012, Americans spent approximately $12 billion on pet food. Yet when the Maryland Task Force on the Establishment of a Statewide Spay/Neuter Fund recommended creating a state-levied surcharge on pet food to finance a spay/neuter program, the industry’s lobbying arm fought vehemently against it—as they have done repeatedly in West Virginia, Indiana, Washington and several other states. The Maryland bill ultimately passed in April 2013.<br /> <br /> The surcharge works by requiring pet food manufacturers to pay an annual $100 registration for each brand they sell in Maryland; this is expected to bring in approximately $1 million yearly to fund spay/neuter. If the pet food companies choose to pass this expense on to their customers, it would cost the average cat owner a mere 26 cents and the annual dog owner 50 cents per animal, per year.<br /> <br /> A pet food surcharge is a reliable, substantial and sustainable source of revenue to fund state-run spay/neuter programs. Pet owners are willing to pay pennies per year to greatly reduce animal suffering. Prevention is the answer, and the time for this legislative solution has come.

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