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Arkansas Living January 2011 : Page37

Scrapbook Arkansas Tuberculosis Sanatorium A By Ouida Cox hundred years ago the Arkansas Tuberculosis Sanatorium was founded on a small pine-covered hill, three miles south of Booneville. Since that time, it has been known as “The Hill” to locals. “The Hill” was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2006 for its association with the nationwide fight against tuberculosis and for its excellent collection of art deco, craftsman and co-lonial revival-style buildings. There are 76 buildings, structures and objects within the district boundary. The sanatorium was the largest and best fa-cility of its kind in the United States in 1940, and it served as a model for tuber-culosis treatment facilities in neighboring states as well as abroad. During the sana-torium’s peak years — the 1930s through the 1950s — there were more than 1,000 patients and 600 full-time and part-time employees on any given month. The institution was completely self-supporting, with workers raising all the food and processing it with a modern cannery and state-of-the-art dairy. In ad-View of Administration Building in the foreground with Nyberg Building in background Front entrance of Nyberg Building, the main hospital building dition to patient treatment buildings, the facility included a water treatment plant, water towers, a fire station, laundry, ice plant, bakery, post office (1927-1968) and movie theater. Gardens, orchards and vineyards were planted in open spaces. More than 70,000 patients were treated by about 5,000 em-ployees during the sanatorium’s 63-year history. The Booneville Human Devel-opment Center has occupied the campus since the sanatorium closed in 1973. The center is a residential treatment facility for adults with developmental disabilities. It currently assists 150 clients and employs a staff of 308 people. • The Chapel JANUARY 2011 RURAL ARKANSAS LIVING I 37

Arkansas Tuberculosis Sanatorium

Ouida Cox

A hundred years ago the Arkansas Tuberculosis Sanatorium was founded on a small pine-covered hill, three miles south of Booneville. Since that time, it has been known as “The Hill” to locals.<br /> <br /> “The Hill” was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2006 for its association with the nationwide fight against tuberculosis and for its excellent collection of art deco, craftsman and colonial revival-style buildings.<br /> <br /> There are 76 buildings, structures and objects within the district boundary. The sanatorium was the largest and best facility of its kind in the United States in 1940, and it served as a model for tuberculosis treatment facilities in neighboring states as well as abroad. During the sanatorium’s peak years — the 1930s through the 1950s — there were more than 1,000 patients and 600 full-time and part-time employees on any given month.The institution was completely self supporting, with workers raising all the food and processing it with a modern cannery and state-of-the-art dairy. In addition to patient treatment buildings, the facility included a water treatment plant, water towers, a fire station, laundry, ice plant, bakery, post office (1927-1968) and movie theater.<br /> <br /> Gardens, orchards and vineyards were planted in open spaces. More than 70,000 patients were treated by about 5,000 employees during the sanatorium’s 63-year history. The Booneville Human Development Center has occupied the campus since the sanatorium closed in 1973. The center is a residential treatment facility for adults with developmental disabilities. It currently assists 150 clients and employs a staff of 308 people. •

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